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Lean In To Retirement

5 Ways to Apply Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In” Philosophy for your Retirement


Sheryl Sandberg’s bestselling book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead has been a hot topic since its release in March 2013 for its message of empowering women in their careers and personal lives.


I first heard Sheryl use the term “Lean In,” on a YouTube video of a commencement speech she did for Barnard in May 2011. Her speech grabbed me as if she had popped out of my computer monitor and said, “Hey you Kim, you better listen up.” This book is the first I’ve read from a woman almost the same exact age as me. So much of what she said and felt in the book matched my own feelings and upbringing.

In order to understand “Lean In,” you have to understand what it is to lean back. Ever since college I’ve been guilty of leaning back. Prior to ever having a boyfriend, a husband, or kids, I’ve been planning my work life around them. Sandberg’s philosophy is so prevalent, I see it come up in conversations often in the middle of a retirement income review for a client. This led me to make a connection to the concept of “lean in” and how it can empower you with your retirement planning. Here are 5 steps you should take to “lean in” on your retirement and take control of your destination.

 

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Phase in retirement

There are many people who can’t retire with the same comfortable standard of living they are accustomed to living during their working years. For those people, the phase in retirement option is a good alternative. Phasing in retirement is a way of gradually pulling back your work hours, earnings, and savings in your 60s, so you don’t have to start pulling from your retirement savings accounts until you are closer to age 70. This gives your retirement assets more time to “bake” and develop before you start stressing them by pulling money out of retirement accounts.

TechGirl Financial Tip: Instead of thinking of your retirement like a light switch that’s either on or off–it can be more like a dimmer switch, turning down work gradually while you turn the living up. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE >>

 

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Lean in to work during your most productive years

There are two important parts to leaning in your 50s. 1. This is your time to work hard and make yourself indispensable so that you will have more options to pull back in your 60s. 2. Save aggressively during your early- to late-50s because these typically are your best paying years of your career. By your mid 50s you should be approaching empty nest syndrome and can afford more time to dedicate to work.

TechGirl Financial Tip: This is about the same time in your life you will be tempted to spend a fortune on children’s college education expenses. Save more for yourself than you spend on your kids. (Should I repeat this?) Your kids can get loans and have a lifetime of income to earn, there are no loans or do-overs if you don’t get it right in retirement.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE >>

 

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Plan your retirement goals

Understand how much money you can retire and live on for the remainder of your life comfortably–without running out of money. (Admit it, this is the biggest fear pre- and post-retirees have). Take time on this effort. You need to plan for what’s expected and what is unexpected. If you do not have the inclination to do it yourself, seek help. This is an extremely important step to get right.

TechGirl Financial Tip: In case you missed it, this is crucial–I cannot stress it enough! Do the hard work now and look at your budget, plan for medical expenses and long term care scenarios – you know, garbage in, garbage out! CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE >>

 

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You’re indispensable now, create an exit strategy

What next? Once you’ve made yourself indispensable, create your exit strategy – you just may be shocked at how willing your manager is to have you stay on–on your terms. Remember, Marissa Mayer became CEO of Yahoo when she was pregnant. Wow! Consider job sharing and consulting, too.

TechGirl Financial Tip: You have to get the five years before and five years after retirement right financially – it sets the stage for the rest of your retirement.
CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE >>

 

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Name your terms and ease your way into retirement!

As you pull away hours worked, you can supplement the money not earned by saving less in your retirement plans. Practice retirement and get an idea of how you want to live your life for the rest of it. When you reach full retirement age for Social Security you may pull back more hours and supplement income with Social Security.

TechGirl Financial Tip: Make sure you understand all your Social Security options before taking it. You can be penalized for taking it early, and the penalty may be even greater if you are still working. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE >>

 

Don’t lean back, lean in and take control of your financial and personal destiny. What do you think? Is this an easier way of looking at how to retire?

Remember, things are possible when you plan, stay disciplined, and are consistent in progressing to your goals. If you would like to see how a plan like this might be customized for you, let’s talk!

 

Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Lean In to Retirement Tip #2 – Lean In To Work

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As we age, we seem to get more confident in our work style and abilities.

If we look beyond the physical implications of aging and hitting our 50s, I believe that decade is a mental and financial sweet spot. I see my clients in their 50s enjoying life more with ample free time for their interests and families, more income to spend, and a better understanding of what their strengths and passions are in their work and personal lives.

When I review my clients’ assets and liabilities, along with their cash flow statements, I typically see a stronger financial picture than they had in their 30s and 40s too.

That said, while you might be tempted to start “kicking back” at this point in your career, I encourage you to think differently and Lean In as Sheryl Sandberg has stated. I recommend you save aggressively during your early- to late-50s because these typically are the best paying years of your career. By your mid 50s your kids are probably older and more independent, or you may be approaching empty nest syndrome and can afford more time to dedicate to work.

Drive your career as if it’s a journey and position yourself as an expert that your company, clients or directors can’t live without. Market yourself based on what you can do that others can’t. Position the services you provide as essential for getting things done in your business. Find out what unique attributes you bring to the table that are needed now and will be needed 15 years from now. If you have to learn a cutting edge new skill, go for it.

If your employer offers training to learn how to get more out of your computer, the Internet, social media or even learning a new language, lean in and get it! Your local community college or university probably offers all kinds of affordable classes in person (and online) to suit your schedule. Of course, you don’t need a formal class to learn. Read a book as an avenue towards broadening your skill and knowledge base. You can also mentor a college student or intern–you may be surprised what they can teach you.

If you’re having a tough time with this one, seek help. I find many career coaches are very good at transforming your career. Now may be a good time to gain clarity in how you will transform your career from working full time in your 50s to working when it’s convenient for you in your 60s. The sooner you develop a roadmap for this exercise, the better off you will be.

Not sure where to find a career coach? The International Coaches Federation or the Professional Association of Resume Writers and Career Coaches websites are good places to start. Ultimately, it’s about leaning in and taking responsibility for your growth to make you that much more invaluable.

This leads me to a TechGirl Financial Tip about your 50s: it’s time to take care of you and your retirement needs.

You may be tempted to spend a fortune on children’s college education expenses now. It’s an understandable desire. However, if you do not have adequate funds saved for both your retirement and your children college expenses, you must save more for yourself and your retirement than you spend on your kids. (Should I repeat this?) Your kids can get loans and have a lifetime of income to earn, there are no loans or do-overs if you don’t get it right in retirement. If this is hard for you to do, think from your children’s future point of view. The burden for your kids to pay off a student loan will be far less stressful than the burden of having to take care of an aging parent physically, emotionally, and financially. You must protect your retirement first, then help with college funding once you know your retirement is secure. See more college funding ideas in my blog article 5 Ways to pay for college on your terms.

 

Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Lean In to Retirement Tip #3 – Plan Retirement Goals

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Close your eyes and imagine, what will you do when your money works for you?

Before you plan financially for retirement, you have to envision what retirement will mean for you. Take some time and really visualize what you want. Try answering these questions:

If you had more time, (not money) what would you do with it?

  • Volunteer for your favorite charity?
  • Spend more time with family?
  • Travel?
  • Learn photography?

Go on take a couple of minutes and write down your thoughts on a piece of paper. If you’re talented enough to sketch it, go ahead and do it now. If you have photos in magazines of activities you enjoy, cut them out and paste on a piece of paper. Be sure to make this realistic – if you can afford to do it now, you can probably afford to do it in retirement as long as you are diligent in saving for it.

Chances are, your retirement will incorporate some of the things you’ve just envisioned and make you happy. This exercise is important because once you have an idea or picture of what lies ahead in retirement, you have more incentive to save for it.

In a nutshell, planning for your retirement goals seem easy. However, I oftentimes hear from people on the verge of retirement that it’s truly scary to think about spending money and no longer saving for the future. Retirees who have done a good job saving find it hard to change their thinking from saving everything to spending it. Funny isn’t it? In retirement it’s easier to save money than it is to spend it. You have to get it right. There are no do-overs if you run out of money before you run out of breath.

Understanding how much money you’ll need to retire and live comfortably for the remainder of your life isn’t as easy as calculating your monthly bills. Many books have been written on the topic. One of my favorites is The Number by Lee Eisenberg; it encourages readers to think beyond a specific number goal they will need, and more about the lifestyle that will make them happy. But later on in the golden years comes uncertainty, when our health declines.

Whether we like to admit it or not, our health, both physically and mentally, spiral downward. We all face the inevitable. There are expenses that can’t be calculated or foreseen. However, other expenses such as your goals can be projected. Your retirement savings will vary depending on lifestyle and career choices made during your working years. Invest in time and plan wisely.

Instead of asking the question how much do I need to save for retirement, the question ought to be: What is a reasonable rate of withdrawal for me to never outlive my money? Once you understand how much you can withdrawal from your savings per year, you’ll have an easier time figuring when you’ll be ready to retire.

There has been a lot of research recommending a reasonable, safe rate of withdrawal in retirement based on different asset allocation models. This is the conversation you need to have with your financial counselor so you understand when you can retire and on how much money you will be able to live on. My favorite research on the topic of safe withdrawal rates are from Michael Kitces, creator of the blog “Nerd’s Eye View,” in particular his article “What Returns are Safe Withdrawal Rates REALLY Based Upon.”

Two other great contributors to the subject are Jonathon Guyton, CFP® and William J. Klinger. They co-authored an article titled “Decision Rules and Maximum Initial Withdrawal Rates” from the Journal of Financial Planning (March, 2006). They are experienced planners working with real retirees – their research is based on practical real-life scenarios. Your withdrawal rate will have to do with your tolerance to market risk, and your asset allocation and a plan that you must be disciplined to adhere to in order to make it work. You will be tested at least a couple times to pull the trigger and move all your money to cash when you are in retirement, but that will not help you with the uncertainty of how long you may live.

Once you’ve answered the question on what you’re safe withdrawal rate will be, add in any other income sources you will have such as social security income, rentals, or pension funds. Once you understand your income in retirement, the next step is to realistically look at your budget.

Plan for expenses.

How much will you need to cover your monthly living expenses? In addition to your regular needs food, utilities, housing, car, insurance, activities, and extras, you will also need to factor in medical/healthcare. An article from the AARP website spells out the costs pretty well: “What Health Care Will Cost You.” When you have Medicare and supplemental coverage, it is not an insignificant monthly expense. There are many tools you can use to help you with the budgeting process. Mint.com is one useful website which will help you put together a budget and alert you if you go over your monthly spending amounts. Remember, when you’re no longer working, you have more time to spend. You will need to fill your days with activities and a budget must include the expense of those activities.

Plan for the unexpected.

Our health is unpredictable. Despite living a healthy lifestyle, we can’t change our genetics or plan for what will specifically happen to us. However, we can be precautionary when planning our retirement goals. The American Hospital Association reports that 82 percent of average hospital stays are because of accidents. Heart complications, stroke and cancer (which affects one in every three women according the American Cancer Society) make up for 68 percent of that. The remaining 18 percent consists of all other procedures and surgeries. Just as we face physical decline, we may also face mental deterioration. Alzheimer’s and dementia affect more than 5 million people in the United States alone according to the Alzheimer’s Association. This disease develops in a person every 68 seconds and is projected to nearly double by 2050.

So while we don’t know what long-term expenses we might find ourselves needing in the future, it is almost certain we will have some unexpected expenses. According to LongTermCare.gov, “70% of people turning age 65 can expect to use some form of long term care during their lives.” Neither Medicare nor the supplemental plans cover long-term care expenses. According to our government, the average long-term care facility charges nearly $230 per day for the care of a single individual. That’s nearly $7,000 a month!

What do you have available to cover these expenses? I find a lot of my clients expect to cover it with the equity in their house, or a large pool of funds they have built specifically for this need. If you’re planning to use equity from your house, make sure it is readily accessible for you or your loved ones. That will make it less stressful to family when the time comes to make the decision. Still others will transfer the risk to an insurance company through an insurance policy such as Long Term Care[i]. If you plan on self-insuring, make sure you have at least $250,000 in order to get you through approximately three to four years in a long term care facility. At $7,000/month[ii], it adds up quickly. If you are going to self insure, it is also important that the money earmarked for these expenses is not sitting idly, but growing at a steady pace to combat the rising cost of inflation associated with long term care.

Seek help.

Feeling overwhelmed? This task is not easy, but it’s vital to get right. Finding a person who can create a custom plan for you and your needs will play a key role in your retirement success.

Allocate sufficient time and resources into this step. It is extremely important to understand what your cash flow will be in retirement, and develop a plan that will build your assets to the point you need them to be in order to retire comfortably. A plan needs to makes sense for your current income, projected inflation, accidents and health decline.

Professional financial planners can help to take the stress out of this tedious task — let them help you!

TechGirl Financial Tip.

In case you missed it, this is crucial — I cannot stress it enough! Do the hard work now and look at your budget, plan for medical expenses and long term care scenarios — you know what they say about data: garbage in, garbage out! Inaccurate figures may produce insufficient funds in your future. Why risk it?

[i] This is not an offer to solicit long term care insurance. Consult with an insurance agent for more facts and information.

[ii] This is a national average. In your location this number may be higher or lower, be sure to research this and account for inflation.

Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Lean In to Retirement Tip #1 – Phase In Retirement

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What happens when you retire and your money works for you?

Will it be enough for you to retire and live comfortably? Many retirees worry more about outliving their money than they fear death itself. Many have grown up so accustomed to living in the present that they have failed to plan properly for the day they no longer want to work and wish to use their time at their leisure.

Conversely, some of us become so connected to what we do; we identify ourselves by our careers. What happens when that career is over? Will we still have the same level of confidence in ourselves? Will we be bored after living so many years on the go? What’s next?

Let’s not forget about our mental health, either. Studies have shown that our brain is like a muscle. The more we use, the less likely we are to lose. Keeping a career and challenging ourselves is a great way to keep our minds active and live a sharper, longer, more engaged lifestyle.

Among those living an active lifestyle are centenarians, those 100 years of age or older. I often frequent 100wisdom.com, a website on aging, that shares stories of some working into their 90s because they like what they did. Others enjoyed playing music, dancing or reading magazines like BusinessWeek or Time. Each of their stories had similar outcomes—their positive outlook on life was accredited to living an active lifestyle.

If keeping your mind engaged and your lifestyle active is what gives you a more positive outlook on life, then there is another option than simply calling it quits one day and retiring. What if instead of turning off your career completely, you slowly began to turn the career dimmer switch lower, while the activity dimmer is turned higher? How about a lifestyle where you can enjoy hobbies and activities you always wanted to do but never had time for when you worked full time?

In a book Don’t Retire, Rewire by Jeri Sedlar and Rick Miners, the author states that “retiring is a going from, rewiring is a going to.” You can see why retirement can be stressful and depressing—it actually means to withdraw from something. If you don’t know what direction you’re moving towards, it can be scary to leave something behind. This can be difficult for many people when they are unsure of what they are going to do next.

Instead, replace the word retire with rewire; it could be a lot more exciting to think of doing something new with your increased access to time.

I believe the answer to these uncertainties is to phase in retirement. Try a practice run until you figure out exactly how you want to spend your time and then slowly start phasing in that new lifestyle. This can help solve the two major dilemmas that keep pre- and newly retired people up at night: will you outlive your money and what will you do with all that time?

Your Money.

So let’s talk about the first preoccupation for retirees: money. Will you have enough to last a lifetime? The answer for most people is no, but only if they replicate their spending habits as if they were still working.

When I address this topic for most retirees who simply don’t have the finances to completely retire in their early 60s, I put together a timeline for them. The timeline allows them to see how a phase in to retirement plan would work. When you are retired, it’s the stress of pulling money out of lifetime savings that causes people to run out of money before they run out of life.

If you were to delay pulling money out of your accounts for another 7-10 years, it could have a dramatic impact on the probability of success of not outliving your money. At the same time, you might be able to stop contributing to your savings and retirement accounts when you reach your early 60s if you don’t access those accounts until your late 60s or early 70s. Perhaps you use the money that typically is earmarked for your retirement contributions in your 60s to do the more costly things on your bucket list while you’re still earning a living.

I often suggest considering a gradual pulling back on working hours into your 60s. Take more vacation time, take unpaid leave off, or negotiate at work to scale back your hours. Continue living off your salary, but scale back savings and allow your investments to bake over the next few years without withdrawing from them.

Addressing how to pull back hours at work will be developed in Step 4 of this series. For now, let’s focus more on the impact on your bottom line.

I highly recommended you don’t do this alone but get the approval of your financial advisor before executing this strategy. You still need to understand if it is okay to do this based on a proper retirement income analysis. If you get the green light from your financial counselor, then here’s a sample timeline:

Early 60s.

Start scaling back hours and stop contributing to retirement accounts. Perhaps cut back 15% on work hours —this is the time to really practice what retirement should look like for you. If after doing this and you can’t make ends meet, review your budget and figure out how you can cut spending. It’s better to start doing this before you retire so you have time to adjust and modify your spending patterns before it’s too late. You will most likely need to cut back your budget in retirement. The sooner you do this, the better the outcome.

Mid 60s.

Once you qualify for full Social Security, consider pulling back your hours to 50 – 60% and use your Social Security checks to supplement your income. Once you reach full retirement age, you can take Social Security and still earn as much as you want, without being penalized.

There are many strategies worth exploring on how to maximize social security for married couples that should be explored prior to signing up for the benefit. I encourage you to work with someone on this and incorporate it into your retirement income analysis, as there are some ways to maximize the benefit that you may not have known existed. Remember, you must wait until you reach your full retirement age before taking Social Security if you do not want to be penalized on the benefit.

To determine your full retirement age, view the following chart provided by the Social Security Administration.

Age to Receive Full Social Security Benefits

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Late 60s.

Pull back to roughly 25-35% working hours. If you need more funds to help supplement the income, start supplementing a little of those funds with your retirement savings. Michael Kitces owner/creator of the blog Nerd’s Eye View and Jonathan Guyton, CFP® both have done extensive research on what is a “safe retirement withdrawal rate.” For more information you can also check out “Decision Rules and Maximum Initial Withdrawal Rates” by Jonathan Guyton CFP® and William J. Klinger.

Under their guidelines typically you can retire and be reasonably certain you won’t run out of funds in retirement if you live off of about 4-5% of your retirement savings and keep your investments allocated between 65-75% still in equity funds. If you are not completely retired, you might only take out 1-2% of retirement assets to supplement the loss of income from dropping back your hours again.

70s.

You call the shots—do you still enjoy your work, or do you want out? If you enjoy work, by all means continue at a moderate pace. But if you’re ready to engage fully in a rewired lifestyle based on your personal interests and hobbies, maybe now’s the time. If you need supplemental income, bump up your withdrawals to the 4-5% safe withdrawal rate and continue living.

Your Time.

Now that we have addressed financial matters, what will you do with your newly acquired personal time? While you’re still working, take the time to begin getting active in your favorite hobbies. Do you enjoy photography, hiking, biking, scrapbooking, cooking, traveling? Consider taking a cooking class, joining a hiking club, take long extended weekend trips.

TechGirl Financial Tip: As you become more active in your hobbies, you may find more ways to make them cost effective. Meet others who share your interests so you can find ways to be social and enjoy activities together. As you get more into activities you enjoy and find others who share your common interest, you will quickly find more ways to be active in those hobbies, which will allow you to fill the longer personal hours as you scale back your work hours. Enjoying your hobbies with others interested in similar hobbies may also allow you to share expenses. Perhaps you share equipment, fees, or travel expenses. This can make your hobbies less expensive as well. I encourage you to get creative and start thinking outside the retirement box so you can start living more.

 

 

Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Lean In to Retirement Tip #4 – Create an Exit Strategy

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You’ve invested your time, money and working hours into making the road to retirement flawless.

The work you put in over the years has made you an intrinsic part of your company’s team. You’ve practically made yourself indispensable. Now what?

Plan your exit strategy. It’s time to begin shifting your focus from value you add to your work to the value you can achieve in your personal life after your professional career ends. This is so counterintuitive to women; if you are a nurturer, it’s hard to think of leaving when the team needs you the most. That is exactly when you have the most bargaining power to name your terms. You are not leaving, you’re pulling back. You just may be shocked at how willing your manager is to have you stay.

Managers and high-level executives understand the value that long-time, savvy professionals add to the success of their company. Your pulling back might lead to incentives to delay your retirement. Conversely, it may lead to bigger doors being opened. During the down years of 2008 and 2009 many professionals in their late 50s to mid-60s were let go. Since then, I have seen some get called back to work because of their expertise and the value they bring to the table. What’s interesting is how they are working on their terms now– less hours, working from home, not commuting as much and having their pick at what they will do vs. what they won’t.

Remember, Marissa Mayer became the CEO of Yahoo when she was pregnant, a rarity in an industry dominated by men. The former Google executive has proven her keep at Yahoo and has been said to have raised its stock price by 100 percent within the first year alone. An indispensable asset if I’ve ever seen one!

Although Mayer wasn’t planning her retirement exit strategy, she was planning for ways to lean in to her work, which will likely result in a comfortable retirement planning process down the road. There is criticism about Mayer, especially from women working at Yahoo seeking a flexible work life balance. There is probably even more criticism from those working at popular companies where jobs are coveted; such as Google, LinkedIn, or Facebook. If you are in one of those firms where the supply of talented workers far exceeds the amount of jobs available, working on your terms may not be an option THERE, but it doesn’t mean it’s not an option elsewhere. Chances are if you are one of the fortunate with a job at one of the most competitive firms in town, you were hired because you stood out and possess exceptional skills. Those skills are needed elsewhere, so go on, market yourself and those skills to seek work on your time.

I often find that some of my clients don’t enjoy pulling away from work completely, a notion shared by many who have worked throughout their lifetime. Not surprisingly, 86 percent of eligible retirees plan to continue working as they lean in to their retirement plan. A good alternative to working full time is job sharing or consulting.

Job sharing allows you to work part-time or on a reduced schedule while sharing the work duties with another person and/or people. Together, you and your colleagues will share the work that would typically be fulfilled by a full-time employee.

Acting as an internal or external consultant is another great option to leaning into your retirement. By now, you have become an expert in your field, and many companies are eager to use consultants to deepen the level of expertise for their clients on a need-to-know basis. You have the freedom to make independent career choices and chose who you want to work with, how often you want to work and the amount of time you want to dedicate to life as a retiree. If this is an option you want to explore, I encourage you to understand how that works financially as your pay structure and benefits will change dramatically.

TechGirl Financial Tip.

You have to get the five years before and five years after retirement right financially — it sets the stage for the rest of your retirement.

During your peak earning years, save aggressively. The more intrinsic value you bring to work, the more value you have on the company. The more value, the more income you receive. Having an aggressive savings strategy before retirement will allow you to live comfortably during and after your retirement transition.

When you phase in retirement and cut back hours you may not be able to save any more because you are working and earning less. Live on your earnings alone and let your assets have time to “bake” or grow without touching them. The longer you wait to start withdrawing assets, the better off your financial position will be when you have to start pulling from them. As you start decreasing your work hours more, then you can gradually start to pull more from your retirement accounts.

Your finances will become even more important after you have shifted from being an employee to a retiree. Remember, the first five years after retirement are critical and set the pace for how you will use your funds for the remainder of your years. Don’t do this alone. I highly recommend you plan for your retirement and how you’ll begin to pull money out of your accounts with a financial planner so you get it right the first time. Keep in mind, there are no do-overs in retirement.

Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

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