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Holiday Blog

Holiday Blog

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

 Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah!

This is such a wonderful time to spend with family and friends. I hope you enjoy the season. I love to bring out my holiday TechGirl Financial logo at this time of year to create a sense of joy for the season. I’m aware however it can be stressful to some because of a limited budget. Here are some of the things I do to make sure I’m on top of my spending:

Check my credit card and bank app almost daily to see how much I’ve spent during the billing cycle.
Before I start shopping I set an amount of money I want to spend in total. Then divide it up between the recipients. On my list I add a line item for charity and myself! Stick as close to the budget as possible.
Online shopping can help a lot in sticking to a budget if you do searches within price ranges you want to spend.
Charity giving – if you intend on giving a substantial amount – consider giving appreciated stock. As an individual taxpayer, – you pay taxes on capital gains. However 501c3 non-profits do not pay taxes and can sell the stock without the tax hit. This will make your money stretch a little bit farther.
There are holiday shopping apps – take a look at them – they can also be helpful in keeping you to a budget.

Fall Financial Reminders

The year is coming to a close. Have you thought about these financial ideas yet?

As every calendar year ends, the window slowly closes on a set of financial opportunities. Here are several you might want to explore before 2015 arrives.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Don’t forget that IRA RMD

If you own one or more traditional IRAs, you have to take your annual required minimum distribution (RMD) from one or more of those IRAs by December 31. If you are being asked to take your very first RMD, you actually have until April 15, 2015 to take it – but your 2015 income taxes may be substantially greater as a result. (Note: original owners of Roth IRAs never have to take RMDs from those accounts.)1

 

 

Did you recently inherit an IRA?

If you have and you weren’t married to the person who started that IRA, you must take the first RMD from that IRA by December 31 of the year after the death of that original IRA owner. You have to do it whether the account is a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA.1

Here’s another thing you might want to do with that newly inherited IRA before New Year’s Eve, though: you might want to divide it into multiple inherited IRAs, thereby promoting a lengthier payout schedule for younger inheritors of those assets. Otherwise, any co-beneficiaries receive distributions per the life expectancy of the oldest beneficiary. If you want to make this move, it must be done by the end of the year that follows the year in which the original IRA owner died.1

 

 

Can you max out your contribution to your workplace retirement plan?

Your employer likely sponsors a 401(k) or 403(b) plan, and you have until December 31 to boost your 2014 contribution. This year, the contribution limit on both plans is $17,500 for those under 50, $23,000 for those 50 and older.2,3

 

 

Can you do the same with your IRA?

Again, December 31 is your deadline for tax year 2014. This year, the traditional and Roth IRA contribution limit is $5,500 for those under 50, $6,500 for those 50 and older. High earners may face a lower Roth IRA contribution ceiling per their adjusted gross income level – above $129,000 AGI, an individual filing as single or head of household can’t make a Roth contribution for 2014, and neither can joint filers with AGI exceeding $191,000.3

 

 

Ever looked into a Solo(k) or a SEP plan?

If you have income from self-employment, you can save for the future using a self-directed retirement plan, such as a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan or a one-person 401(k), the so-called Solo(k). You don’t have to be exclusively self-employed to set one of these up – you can work full-time for someone else and contribute to one of these while also deferring some of your salary into the retirement plan sponsored by your employer.2

Contributions to SEPs and Solo(k)s are tax-deductible. December 31 is the deadline to set one up for 2014, and if you meet that deadline, you can make your contributions for 2014 as late as April 15, 2015 (or October 15, 2015 with a federal extension). You can contribute up to $52,000 to SEP for 2014, $57,500 if you are 50 or older. For a Solo(k), the same limits apply but they break down to $17,500 + up to 20% of your net self-employment income and $23,000 + 20% net self-employment income if you are 50 or older. If you contribute to a 401(k) at work, the sum of your employee salary deferrals plus your Solo(k) contributions can’t be greater than the aforementioned $17,500/$23,000 limits – but even so, you can still pour up to 20% of your net self-employment income into a Solo(k).1,2

 

 

Do you need to file IRS Form 706?

A sad occasion leads to this – the death of a spouse. Form 706, which should be filed no later than nine months after his or her passing, notifies the IRS that some or all of a decedent’s estate tax exemption is being carried over to the surviving spouse per the portability allowance. If your spouse passed in 2011, 2012, or 2013, the IRS is allowing you until December 31, 2014 to file the pertinent Form 706, which will transfer that estate planning portability to your estate if your spouse was a U.S. citizen or resident.1

 

 

Are you feeling generous?

You may want to donate appreciated securities to charity before the year ends (you may take a deduction amounting to their current market value at the time of the donation, and you can use it to counterbalance up to 30% of your AGI). Or, you may want to gift a child, relative or friend and take advantage of the annual gift tax exclusion. An individual can gift up to $14,000 this year to as many other individuals as he or she desires; a couple may jointly gift up to $28,000 to as many individuals as you wish. Whether you choose to gift singly or jointly, you’ve probably got a long way to go before using up the current $5.34 million/$10.68 million lifetime exemption. Wealthy grandparents often fund 529 plans this way, so it is worth noting that December 31 is the 529 funding deadline for the 2014 tax year.1

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– csmonitor.com/Business/new-economy/2014/1024/New-home-sales-inch-up-to-a-six-year-high-in-September [10/24/14]
2 – 247wallst.com/economy/2014/10/22/september-cpi-avoids-deflation-fears/ [10/22/14]
3 – conference-board.org/data/bcicountry.cfm?cid=1 [10/23/14]
4 – markets.on.nytimes.com/research/markets/usmarkets/usmarkets.asp [10/24/14]
5 – markets.wsj.com/us [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [10/24/14]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [10/24/14]

Should You Buy the Dips?

Should You Buy the Dips?

Market retreats & corrections may herald opportunities.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

When stocks retreat, should you pick up some shares?

If you like to buy and hold, it may turn out to be a great move.

Buying during a downturn or a correction may seem foolish to many, but if major indexes sink and investors lose their appetite for risk, you may find excellent opportunities to purchase shares of quality firms.

Remember what Warren Buffett said back in 2008: “A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful.” Even in that terrible bear market, savvy investors like Buffett sensed an eventual upside.1

 

 

Great stocks could go on sale.

Corrections and downturns are part of the natural cycle of the equities markets. Wall Street has seen 20 corrections (10% or greater declines in the S&P 500) in the last 70 years, and stocks have weathered all of them.2

A comeback can occur not long after a correction: as S&P Capital IQ chief stock strategist Sam Stovall reminded Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, it usually takes about four months for the market to get back to where it was.2

After a market descent, there is ultimately a point of capitulation – a turning point when investors start buying again. Prior to that moment, you may find some good deals. Why not make a list of stocks you would buy at the right price, and perhaps define that price?

 

 

 

Some downturns & corrections go under the radar.

Particular sectors of the market may dip 5%, 10% or more without much fanfare, because the focus is constantly on the movement of the big benchmarks. You might want to keep an eye on a particular slice of the market that has turned sour – it could turn sweet again, and sooner than bears think.

 

 

Don’t let the gloom dissuade you.

Remember 2008? Stocks were supposedly down for the count. You had people who believed the Dow would fall below 5,000 and stay there. They were wrong. Seasoned investors like Buffett knew that measures would be taken to repair the economy, restore confidence and right the markets.

As he noted in an October 2008 New York Times op-ed piece, “To be sure, investors are right to be wary of highly leveraged entities or businesses in weak competitive positions. But fears regarding the long-term prosperity of the nation’s many sound companies make no sense. These businesses will indeed suffer earnings hiccups, as they always have. But most major companies will be setting new profit records 5, 10 and 20 years from now.”1

Since the end of World War II, Wall Street has experienced 13 bear markets and 20 corrections. Even so, large-company stocks have returned an average of 11.1% per year since 1945.2

 

 

Decline thresholds may be useful.

If you practice dollar-cost averaging (i.e., you invest a set amount of money each month in your retirement account), you know that your money will end up buying more shares when prices are lower and fewer when they are higher. You can lift this strategy and apply it in a market dip or downturn. Instead of investing a set amount of funds per time period, you invest a set amount of funds at a decline threshold. So if the balance of your retirement account falls 5%, you put a set amount of funds in. If shares of a particular company fall 5%, you use a set amount of funds to acquire more of them.

Some people don’t like the buy-and-hold approach and would contend that tactical asset allocation has the potential to work just as well or better in a downturn. Whether you like to buy and hold or not, the chance to buy low is not easily dismissed. No one is guaranteeing you will sell high, of course – but you might find bargains amid all the bears.

 

 

Think about taking the opportunity to add to your portfolio if the market pulls back.

A market drop may be your cue to buy shares of quality companies at a cheaper price.

Disclosure:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | San Jose address 111 N. Market St. Suite 300 San Jose, CA 95113.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2014/02/04/where-to-get-greedy-now-that-others-are-fearful/ [2/4/14]

2 – kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C008-S002-how-to-survive-a-stock-market-correction.html [8/14]

Financial Considerations for 2015

Financial Considerations for 2015

Is it time to make a few alterations for the near future?

2015 is less than three months away. Fall is the time when investors look for ways to lower their taxes and make some financial. This is an ideal time to schedule a meeting with a financial, tax or estate planning professional.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

How do economists see next year unfolding?

Morningstar sees 2.0-2.5% GDP for the U.S. for 2015, with housing, export growth, wage growth, very low interest rates and continuing vitality of energy-dependent industries as key support factors. It sees the jobless rate in a 5.4-5.7% range and annualized inflation running between 1.8-2.0%. Fitch is far more optimistic, envisioning U.S. GDP at 3.1% for 2015 compared to 1.3% for the eurozone and Japan. (Fitch projects China’s economy slowing to 6.8% growth next year as India’s GDP improves dramatically to 6.5%.)1,2

The Wall Street Journal’s Economic Forecasting Survey projects America’s GDP at 2.8% for both 2015 and 2016 and sees slightly higher inflation for 2015 than Morningstar (with the CPI rising at an annualized 2.0-2.2%). The Journal has the jobless rate at 5.9% by the end of this year and at 5.5% by December 2015.3

The WSJ numbers roughly correspond to the Federal Reserve’s outlook: the Fed sees 2.6-3.0% growth and 5.4-5.6% unemployment next year. A National Association for Business Economics (NABE) poll projects 2015 GDP of 2.9% with the jobless rate at 5.6% by next December.4

 

 

 

What might happen with interest rates?

In the Journal’s consensus forecast, the federal funds rate will hit 0.47% by June 2015 and 1.17% by December 2015. NABE’s forecast merely projects it at 0.845% as next year concludes. That contrasts with Fed officials, who see it in the range of 1.25-1.50% at the end of 2015.3,4

Speaking of interest rates, here is the WSJ consensus projection for the 10-year Treasury yield: 3.24% by next June, then 3.58% by the end of 2015. The latest WSJ survey also sees U.S. home prices rising 3.3% for 2015 and NYMEX crude at $93.67 a barrel by the end of next year.3

 

 

 

Can you put a little more into your IRA or workplace retirement plan?

You may put up to $5,500 into a traditional or Roth IRA for 2014 and up to $6,500 if you are 50 or older this year, assuming your income levels allow you to do so. (Or you can spread that maximum contribution across more than one IRA.) Traditional IRA contributions are tax-deductible to varying degree. The contribution limit for participants in 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans is $17,500 for 2014, with a $5,500 catch-up contribution allowed for those 50 and older. (The IRS usually sets next year’s contribution levels for these plans in late October.)5

 

 

Should you go Roth in 2015?

If you have a long time horizon to let your IRA grow, have the funds to pay the tax on the conversion, and want your heirs to inherit tax-free distributions from your IRA, it may be worth it.

 

 

 

Are you thinking about an IRA rollover?

You should know about IRS Notice 2014-54, which lets taxpayers make “split” IRA rollovers of employer-sponsored retirement plan assets under more favorable tax conditions. If you have a workplace retirement account with a mix of pre-tax and after-tax dollars in it, you can now roll the pre-tax funds into a traditional IRA and the after-tax funds into a Roth IRA and have it all count as one distribution rather than two. Also, the IRS is dropping the pro rata tax treatment of such rollover amounts. (Under the old rules, if you were in a qualified retirement plan and rolled $80,000 in pre-tax dollars into a traditional IRA and $20,000 in after-tax dollars into a Roth IRA, 80% of the dollars going into the Roth would be taxed under the pro-rated formula.) The tax liability that previously went with such “split” distributions has been eliminated. The new rules on this take effect January 1, but IRS guidance indicates that taxpayers may apply the rules to rollovers made as early as September 18, 2014.6

 

 

Can you harvest portfolio losses before 2015?

Through tax loss harvesting – dumping the losers in your portfolio – you can claim losses equaling any capital gains recognized in a tax year, and you can claim up to $3,000 in additional losses beyond that, which can offset dividend, interest and wage income. If your losses exceed that limit, they can be carried over into future years. It is a good idea to do this before December, as that will give you the necessary 30 days to repurchase any shares should you wish.7

 

 

Should you wait on a major financial move until 2015?

Is there a chance that your 2014 taxable income could jump as a consequence of exercising a stock option, receiving a bonus at work, or accepting a lump sum payout? Are you thinking about buying new trucks or cars for your company, or a buying a building? The same caution applies to capital investments.

 

 

Look at tax efficiency in your portfolio.

You may want to put income-producing investments inside an IRA, for example, and direct investments with lesser tax implications into brokerage accounts.

 

 

Finally, do you need to change your withholding status?

If major change has come to your personal or financial life, it might be time. If you have married or divorced, if a family member has passed away, if you are self-employed now or have landed a much higher-salaried job, or if you either pay a lot of tax or get unusually large IRS or state refunds, review your current withholding with your tax preparer.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2014/02/04/where-to-get-greedy-now-that-others-are-fearful/ [2/4/14]

2 – kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C008-S002-how-to-survive-a-stock-market-correction.html [8/14]

Money & Taxes After Marriage

Money & Taxes After Marriage

Some not-so-small matters to think about.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

When you tie the knot, your financial lives will change.

Marriage is one of those life events that can really affect your money and tax situation. If you are about to wed, here are a couple of things you’ll want to consider when it comes to taxes and household cash flow.

 

 

You can now elect to file jointly.

Marriage allows you to file your income taxes together, and that can really benefit your financial picture. Joint filers may deduct two exemption amounts from their income, which amounts to one of the biggest standard deductions in the federal tax code. For 2014, a single filer can take a standard deduction of $6,200 but a married couple filing jointly can take one of $12,400.1

In addition, joint filers are eligible for key tax breaks at comparatively higher income thresholds than single filers, and filing jointly opens the door to eligibility for the American Opportunity and Lifetime Learning Credits, the Child and Dependent Care Credit, the adoption credit and the Earned Income Tax Credit.2

 

 

 

So why would any married couple file separately?

Good question. In most cases, filing separately invites higher taxes for a married couple, and when marrieds forego joint filing, they become ineligible for the tuition and fees deduction, the student loan deduction and most of the deductions mentioned in the preceding paragraph.2

The deduction for traditional IRA contributions really shrinks if you reject joint filing status. Want an example? Look at the difference if you contribute to a traditional IRA in 2014 while covered by a retirement plan at work. Marrieds who file jointly may take a full deduction up to the amount of their contribution limit if their 2014 modified AGI is $96,000 or less. Marrieds who file separately can’t take any deduction for traditional IRA contributions once their 2014 income hits $10,000. (Only a partial deduction is available underneath that threshold.)2,3

In rare circumstances, filing separately may offer particular tax advantages. Take the case of a couple with a high adjusted gross income and major out-of-pocket medical expenses. Under the federal tax code, you can only deduct the amount of those costs that exceeds 10% of AGI. If the hypothetical couple has an AGI of $220,000 when filing jointly, 10% of that is $22,000. If they file separately, the 10% threshold can apply to only one of the couple’s incomes. If the afflicted person has an AGI of $40,000, the 10% threshold becomes $4,000. (One note here: until December 31, 2016, taxpayers who are age 65 and older and their spouses may deduct out-of-pocket medical care expenses that exceed 7.5% of AGI. That also applies for individuals who turn 65 during the tax year.)2

 

 

Run the numbers to see which filing status gives you the lowest taxes.

That may sound arduous, but software and/or a professional tax preparer will make it less so for you. You will probably elect to file jointly, but compare the projections to inform your decision.

 

 

Your household budget will likely need adjusting.

Maybe you were only budgeting for one before this; now you need to budget for two, or maybe two plus kids. If you are newlyweds without kids, you still need to watch income, debts and assets. Find a screen or a piece of paper and list your combined monthly income sources and your essential and discretionary expenses each month. Aim to save some money per month for your emergency fund, even just a little.

A conversation about how you each see money will be informative. How much should you spend each month? How should you attack debts? What accounts should you consolidate, and what legal and financial paperwork do you need to update? Will you own certain assets jointly, or individually? Beyond the budget, pursuing long-term money goals with a shared investment outlook is important. Life insurance and a will also go on your to-do list.

All this is relevant for blended families too, of course, and they have other concerns as well. Existing trusts and beneficiary designations may need to be modified with the marriage. College aid may be harder to come by: if a “custodial” parent goes from single to married, the stepdad or stepmom’s income goes into the FAFSA calculation. Child support from past spouses may be inadequate or absent. In late 2013, a Census Bureau report looking at the years 1994-2012 found that in cases where the child had no contact with the other parent, child support was paid less than 31% of the time. In 2011, less than 50% of eligible parents actually got 100% of the child support payments awarded to them. About a quarter of eligible parents received nothing. Blended families need to be vigilant about these possible predicaments.4,5

 

 

Set aside some time for a conversation.

Turn to a financial professional for input, if you wish. When you address these issues proactively, you do yourselves a financial favor. Discussing these kinds of matters and planning for them as a couple can help “marry” your financial lives and put them on the same page.

 

 

 

Disclosure:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated. Gaxiola Financial Group | San Jose address 111 N. Market St. Suite 300 San Jose, CA 95113.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
– taxfoundation.org/article/2014-tax-brackets [11/27/13]

2 – turbotax.intuit.com/tax-tools/tax-tips/IRS-Tax-Return/Should-You-and-Your-Spouse-File-Taxes-Jointly-or-Separately-/INF20137.html [8/21/14]

3 – tinyurl.com/k3omgyk [2/19/14]

4 – money.msn.com/family-money/4-money-traps-of-blended-families [2/15/13]

5 – articles.latimes.com/2013/nov/20/nation/la-na-1121-child-support-20131121 [11/20/1

A Plan to Put the Brakes on the “Flash Boys”

A Plan to Put the Brakes on the “Flash Boys”

The SEC rolls out a test program. How much impact will it have?

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

The Securities & Exchange Commission wants to address the pricing inefficiencies linked with high-speed trading. With that goal in mind, it has ordered the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and national securities exchanges to implement a trial program that may end up boosting the trading volume of small-cap shares.1

That could heighten the market quality for those stocks. While analysts generally applaud the initiative, critics wonder how significant it will be.

A yearlong experiment is poised to start.

Assuming the proposal emerges from a 21-day public comment period unscathed, the SEC will oversee the application of slightly different trading standards to three groups of small-cap stocks during a 12-month window. Each of the three groups will include shares from 400 firms with market caps of $5 billion or less. Each group will be compared against a control group of the same size and composition.1,2

 

 

If tick sizes change, will that change trading?

Small-cap shares are lightly traded with prices moving a penny at a time. High-frequency traders benefit from these conditions. If the share prices are quoted in nickel increments, will that slow the “flash boys” down?3

That’s what the SEC wants to learn. So as part of the experiment, it will adjust the “tick size” from one cent to five cents for some of these small-cap stocks. In the control group, the tick size will remain at a penny per share. In test group #1, trading would occur at any permissible price increment. Within test group #2, securities will be quoted at and trade in nickel increments (with some exceptions). The tick size would also be widened to a nickel in test group #3, but transactions would also be bound by a “trade-at” requirement, which thwarts price matching by a trading center that doesn’t present the best bid or offer. (That is, it helps to steer trading toward public exchanges.)1,2

A nickel-tick environment might reduce market distortions and the profits that high-speed traders could subtly skim off the small caps.

 

 

What flaws may emerge in this pilot program?

Some analysts think this experiment could be more stringently conducted. For example, there are a baker’s dozen worth of exceptions in the “trade-at” test group that permit pilot shares to be exchanged outside the five-cent tick size. The SEC has driven the program forward without fielding any input from public corporations. Additionally, some analysts think that publicly stating the length of the pilot program is a mistake; they contend that this will offer creative traders unintended opportunities.3

 

 

A small step forward is better than none.

Securities regulators have heard the public outcry in the wake of the best-selling Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt and are responding. In a year, data will bear out whether altering the tick size will improve this segment of the market.

Disclosure:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | San Jose address 111 N. Market St. Suite 300 San Jose, CA 95113.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– reuters.com/article/2014/08/26/sec-pilotprogram-idUSL1N0QW2IG20140826 [8/26/14]

2 – tinyurl.com/nkfputs [8/27/14]

3 – tinyurl.com/qdaobd9 [8/27/14]

2 – kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C008-S002-how-to-survive-a-stock-market-correction.html [8/14]

Moving From The Moment To The Future

Shifting the focus from the short term to the long term.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

How many short-term financial decisions do you make each week?

You probably make more than a few. They may feel routine. They may demand your attention, day in and day out. Yet in managing these day-to-day issues, you may be drawn away from making the long-term money decisions that could prove vital to your financial well-being.

 

 

How many long-term financial decisions have you made for yourself?

How steadily have you saved and planned for retirement? Have you looked into ideas that may help to lower your taxes or preserve more of the money you have accumulated?

As Nielsen notes, women are the financial decision-makers in their households – they not only make the lion’s share of the nation’s consumer purchasing choices, they also influence or handle many buying decisions on durable goods such as cars and houses. Fleishman-Hillard Inc. forecasts that women will control 2/3 of consumer wealth between now and 2023, and will be predisposed to inherit the bulk of the biggest generational transfer of wealth the U.S. has ever known in the coming decades.1

While many women feel adept at making money decisions for today, some are less confident about making financial decisions for tomorrow. That anxiety may be unwarranted, however.

University of California professor Terry Odean has spent more than 20 years breaking down stock market investing behavior by gender, and believes women are better investors. He has numbers to back this up: as the Washington Post noted, he studied male and female investors over seven years and found that women got 1.4% better overall returns than men did. Across the length of the study, the investment returns achieved by single women exceeded those of single men by 2.3%. Investment groups populated by women got a 4.6% better return versus investment groups made up of men.2

Odean feels that men suffer from overconfidence in investing, while women invest more pragmatically, turning away from opportunistic day trading and taking more of a buy-and-hold approach. A bit controversial, this assertion? Perhaps. The statistics certainly get your attention. The bottom line is that women may be more adept at investing than they think.2

Even if you feel you need more financial or stock market literacy, you may fundamentally have the temperament to be a good long-term investor.

 

 

 

Where do you stand financially?

Start by taking an inventory of your investments and savings accounts: their balances, their purposes. Then, take an inventory of income sources: yours, and those of your spouse or family if applicable. Consider also your probable or possible income sources after you retire: Social Security and others.

This is a way to start seeing where you are financially in terms of your progress toward a financially stable retirement and your retirement income. It may also illuminate potential new directions for you:

*The need to save or invest more (especially since parenting or caregiving may interrupt your career and affect your earnings)

*The need for greater income (negotiate for a raise!) or additional income sources down the road

*Risks to income and savings (and the need to plan greater degrees of insulation from them)

Devoting even just an hour of attention to these matters may give you a clear look at your financial potential for tomorrow. Proceed from this step to the next: follow with another hour devoted to a chat with an experienced financial professional.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.
Gaxiola Financial Group | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1 – nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2013/u-s–women-control-the-purse-strings.html [4/2/13]
2 – tinyurl.com/p4wqt8e [10/11/13]

 

Should You Change Jobs or Stay the Course?

Does sticking with the same firm actually hurt your financial potential?

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

If you spend two years or less at a series of jobs, is that a problem?

Shouldn’t your resume signal loyalty instead of transience?

Well, maybe it isn’t a problem. Maybe you are doing yourself a financial favor instead, especially in this decade. Maybe the conventional wisdom about getting ahead is flawed. The era of the organization man/woman is long gone, and how many people do you know who have spent a decade or longer working for one employer?

 

 

Remember 5% annual raises?

You don’t see them much anymore. In fact, when the respected HR firm Buck Consultants released its 2013 employee compensation forecast, it projected that “the median salary increase in 2013 will be 3%” and that “the new normal for salary increases will settle at this 3% level.”1

Chances are, your most recent raise was on the order of 2-3%. While you are keeping up with consumer prices at that rate, you may not be making up for any financial steps you took backward as a result of the recession. Even the all-stars at your firm may be getting just a 5-6% yearly raise.

 

 

Why does jumping ship so often mean a jump in pay?

As a senior hiring manager who has worked with Intuit and other Fortune 500 firms in the San Francisco Bay Area recently commented to Forbes, “I would often see resumes that only had a few years at each company. I found that the people who had switched companies usually commanded a higher salary.”2

“The problem with staying at a company forever,” she reflected, “is [that] you start with a base salary and usually annual raises are based on a percentage of your current salary. There is often a limit to how high your manager can bump you up … however, if you move to another company, you start fresh and can usually command a higher base salary to hire you.”2

 

 

Why is wage growth lagging in the recovery?

Look at inflation. It is still in the 2% range. If consumer prices were rising 5% a year, things might be different. Because they aren’t, employers face less pressure to bump up salaries. Last year, Towers Watson surveyed 900+ mid-size and large employers and learned that a 3% raise at these firms would be par for the course in 2014. It was also the norm in 2013 and 2012.2,3

Since inflation is at roughly 2% right now, a 3% raise amounts to only a 1% gain versus the cost of living. In theabove-mentioned Forbes article, Forbes contributor Cameron Keng notes that “staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more.”2

How does he reach this conclusion? He plots out a 10-year graph in which an employee starts at a salary of $100,000, assuming 3% annual raises and a “conservative” 10% increase in pay per job change. After 10 years at one employer and a decade of 3% raises, the extreme loyalist is earning $130,000. In contrast, a more opportunistic worker who changes jobs four times and works for five employers in those ten years will be earning about $170,000 a decade on.2

 

 

If you want change, when should you make your move?

U.S. News & World Report recently addressed that question in its Jobs in 2020 web special. It cited several circumstances that might call for a job change: you’ve worked for the same company for 10 years or longer, your skill set is underappreciated, you find yourself battling your co-workers, or your goals differ from the company’s goals. If you’ve just come back from a vacation or wrapped up a major project, it might be a good time to make a change. If a fiscal year is just ending for your employer, this might be another prime time.4

On the other hand, there are bad times to change jobs, and USN&WR also noted some of those. If you’re overworked, having interpersonal issues at the office or just bored, you can overreact; restructuring your workday or work tasks may offer a solution. If a major life event, long vacation or house hunt is just ahead, a job change may not be ideal or smart. It may not be wise if you sense that the economy (or your industry) is in line for a downturn, or if you’ve been at your job for less than a year. Lastly, a job search that coincides with the holiday season may be more prolonged than you anticipate; HR officers and managers may be more available (and less stressed) when mid-January rolls around.4

If you love what you do and are good at it, you may see no reason to change jobs. Alternately, you might reason that you could excel and love your work even more in a new environment. Consider the above-mentioned factors (and others) if you are looking for greener grass.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.
Gaxiola Financial Group | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1– tlnt.com/2012/11/08/remember-those-3-salary-increases-now-theyre-the-new-normal/ [11/8/12]
2 – forbes.com/sites/cameronkeng/2014/06/22/employees-that-stay-in-companies-longer-than-2-years-get-paid-50-less/2/ [6/22/14]
3 – usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/09/18/how-much-of-a-pay-raise-can-you-expect-in-2014/2832791/ [9/18/13]
4 – money.usnews.com/money/careers/slideshows/the-10-best-times-to-switch-jobs [3/12/14]
5 – money.usnews.com/money/careers/slideshows/the-10-worst-times-to-switch-jobs [9/18/13]

Visualizing the Retirement You Desire

It was an honor to be asked to publish content for mint.com. The following is a link to the article.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Take a minute – put down your smartphone, look away from your computer and close your eyes for a moment. What will you do, when your money works for you?

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.
Gaxiola Financial Group | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations.
1– blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2014/07/18/about-that-big-vix-spike/ [7/18/14]
2 – google.com/finance?q=INDEXSP%3A.INX&ei=44bJU-jFFer8igLgzYGgAg [7/18/14]
3 – briefing.com/investor/calendars/economic/2014/07/14-18 [7/18/14]
4 – investing.com/economic-calendar/ [7/18/14]
5 – reuters.com/article/2014/07/17/us-housing-starts-idUSKBN0FM1FT20140717 [7/17/14]
6 – usatoday.com/money/markets/overview/ [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=7%2F18%2F13&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=7%2F18%2F13&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=7%2F18%2F13&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=7%2F10%2F09&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=7%10F2%2F09&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=7%2F10%2F09&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=7%2F19%2F04&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=7%2F19%2F04&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
7 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=7%2F19%2F04&x=0&y=0 [7/18/14]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [7/18/14]
9 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [7/18/14]

Blog Post on Opening Day

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Take me out to the ball game…..This past week the start of the baseball season was celebrated in stadiums across the nation. After a long winter, the start of the season marks the beginning of spring and warmer days ahead as we enjoy our national pastime.

Our local favorites, the San Francisco Giants, started their season with a win against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Closer to home, our son Noah started his third season playing Pinto Baseball in Morgan Hill, and as luck would have it, he’s on the Giants- sporting the black and orange colors of the team. I couldn’t be happier with the selection however Noah would have preferred to be on the Cubs team. With respect to his roots, he will never forget being born outside of Chicago and this has made him a die hard Cubs fan.

For the third year in a row, Tech Girl Financial proudly sponsored Noah’s team. It’s great to see Tech Girl Financial printed on the baseball hats and team banner, and selfishly, it frees up my time from having to volunteer at the snack shack. However, the sponsorship is much more than that. I want my son to understand and appreciate that I am supportive of him and his efforts as well as those of his team. I show this by being at his side during the games and practices donning my own Giants gear of black and orange and cheering the whole team. I know that the financial contribution to help the league may be a small token, however I enjoy illustrating to my son that Mom’s business supports his commitment to the team.

At this level, we can expect that there will be some bumps along the way, and Noah will have his ups and downs with the sport. It’s all part of the process. Regardless of the outcome of the game or the season, I will be his biggest fan and cheer on the orange and black.

 

Kim Gaxiola may be reached at (800) 584.3652 or kim@gaxiolafinancialgroup.com or www.techgirlfinancial.com.
TechGirl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.
Gaxiola Financial Group | 305 Vineyard Town Center #369 | Morgan Hill, CA 95037

Lean In To Retirement

Check out TechGirl Financial's Article Series on how to "Lean In To Retirement".

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Kim will put you at ease with your financial planning and help you to create a clear picture of your financial future!

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Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisors Services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, a Registered Investment Advisor.

Tech Girl Financial is not affiliated with Cambridge. Check the background of this investment professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
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