fbpx

What will you do when your money works for you? | Call 1-800-584-3652 | Account

Could It Be?

could it be

Researchers Find A Hiring Bias That Favors Women

Provided by TechGirl Financial

Think, for just a moment, about the last job you applied for.


If you didn’t get the job (apologies), did you get an interview? If not, did you feel some hidden forces, beyond your control, working against you?


Perceived hiring biases against women working in science, technology, engineering and math have been around as long as women have been graduating from STEM programs. From 2008 to 2010, women received the majority of doctorate degrees in life and social sciences but only 32 percent of the open assistant professorships.


Now comes a study that offers something of a counter-narrative — that, given the chance, universities would rather hire women for STEM tenure-track positions.


The experiment at the heart of the study included 873 faculty members across biology, engineering, economics and psychology departments at 371 universities and colleges.


Participants were asked to rank the profiles of three hypothetical candidates. Two of those fake applicants were similarly qualified and differed only in gender. A third, less-qualified applicant was included to disguise the intention of the experiment.
Overall, the well-qualified woman ranked first 67 percent of the time. She was preferred over the similarly qualified male candidate in every field except economics, where the preference was evenly split.


“To say that these findings were unexpected … is an understatement,” says Wendy Williams of Cornell University and one of the researchers behind the study.


Here’s why they were unexpected. In previous research, Williams had already found that women who apply for STEM faculty positions are more likely to be hired than male candidates. But she thought this was because the women who make it through STEM graduate programs have an edge somehow — more motivated, better pedigree, higher aptitude, etc.


But Williams’ new research suggests this hiring bias isn’t just a preference for the stronger candidate.


She found that, when a man and a woman had exactly the same credentials, universities still showed a 2:1 preference for hiring the woman.


Even when the researchers took away participants’ ability to make relative comparisons — by randomly assigning them to rate either just the man or just the woman — the female candidate scored higher.
For once, it appears that men are getting the short end of the stick.


“It’s a provocative study,” says Donna Ginther, professor of economics at the University of Kansas, that doesn’t replicate the real world.


For starters, Ginther says, employers don’t decide whom to hire just by looking at an application. A candidate who’s average on paper can win the room with a great interview. Likewise, a candidate can check all the right boxes on paper but fall short with a flimsy handshake.


This study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, captures the most frustrating — and mysterious — phase of the hiring process: When an employer sifts through hundreds of resumes, trying to decide who should get an interview.


Yet this mystery remains: With lots of women now earning STEM degrees and schools apparently eager to hire them into tenure-track jobs, why do so many women simply not apply?


If the answer is, because of a long-held belief that women in STEM don’t get equal consideration, then this research should be a wake-up call.


By Owen Phillips

 

 

 

Why Well-Diversified Portfolios Have Lagged the S&P

Why Well-Diversified Portfolios Have Lagged the S&P

Some investors have seen minimal returns compared to the benchmark.
Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Diversification is essential, yet it comes with trade-offs.

Investors are repeatedly urged to allocate portfolio assets across a variety of investment classes. This is fundamental; market shocks and month-to-month volatility may bring big losses to portfolios weighted too heavily in one or two classes.

Just as there is a potential upside to diversification, there is also a potential downside. It can expose a percentage of the portfolio to underperforming sectors of the market. Last year, that kind of exposure affected the returns of some prudent investors.

Sometimes diversification hinders overall performance.

The stock market has performed well of late, but very few portfolios have 100% allocation to stocks for sensible reasons. At times investors take a quick glance at stock index performance and forget that their return reflects the performance of multiple market segments. While the S&P 500 rose 11.39% in 2014 (13.69% with dividends), other asset classes saw minor returns or losses last year.1

As an example, Morningstar assessed fixed-income managers for 2014 and found a median return of just 2.35% for domestic high yield strategies. The Barclays U.S. Aggregate Bond Index advanced 5.97% in 2014 (that encompasses coupon payments and capital appreciation), while the Citigroup Non-U.S. World Government Bond index lost 2.68%.1,2

Turning to some very conservative options, the 10-year Treasury had a 2.17% yield on December 31, 2014; at the start of last year, it was yielding 3.00%. As March began, Bankrate found the annual percentage yield for a 1-year CD averaged 0.27% nationally, with the yields on 5-year CDs averaging 0.87%; last year’s average yields were similar.3,4

Oil’s poor 2014 affected numerous portfolios. Light sweet crude ended 2014 at just $53.27 on the NYMEX, going -45.42% on the year. (In 2008, prices peaked at $147 a barrel). Correspondingly, the Thomson Reuters/CRB Commodities Index, which tracks the 19 most watched commodity futures, dropped 17.9% in 2014 after slips of 5.0% in 2013, 3.4% in 2012 and 8.3% in 2011. At the end of last year, it was at the same level it had been at the end of 2008.5,6

The longstanding MSCI EAFE Index (which measures the overall performance of 21 Morgan Stanley Capital International indices in Europe and the Asia Pacific region) lost 7.35% for 2014. At the end of last year, it had returned an average of 2.34% across 2010-2014. So on the whole, equity indices in the emerging markets and the eurozone have not performed exceptionally well last year or over the past few years.7

All this is worth considering for investors wondering why their highly diversified, cautiously allocated portfolios lagged the main U.S. benchmark. It may also present a decent argument for tactical asset allocation – the intentional, responsive shift of percentages of portfolio assets into the best-performing sectors of the market. Whether an investor favors that kind of dynamic strategy or a buy-and-hold approach with a far-off time horizon in mind, it is inevitable that some portion of portfolio assets will be held in currently lagging or underperforming investment classes. This is one of the trade-offs of diversification. In some years – such as 2014 – being ably diversified may result in less-than-desired returns.

 

Disclosure:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Kim Gaxiola, CFP® Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.

TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suite 300| San Jose, CA 95113 P:800.584.3652

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Disclosure:
Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
1 – qz.com/320196/its-over-stocks-beat-bonds/ [1/2/15]
2 – tinyurl.com/oq6cb7w [2/23/15]
3 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=yieldYear&year=2014 [3/3/15]
4 – bankrate.com/funnel/cd-investments/cd-investment-results.aspx?prods=15,19 [3/3/15]
5 – money.cnn.com/data/commodities/ [12/31/14]
6 – nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11387661 [1/17/15]
7 – mscibarra.com/products/indices/international_equity_indices/gimi/stdindex/performance.html [12/31/14]

Why in the world do we ask our seniors in high school to sign up for an expensive college education without teaching them about financial terms?

Why in the world do we ask our seniors in high school to sign up for an expensive college education without teaching them about financial terms?

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

This is the biggest title for a blog post I’ve ever made. I’m hoping it creates a dialog that goes viral and does our children some good. If you haven’t noticed I’m passionate about this subject. Today is my daughters 13th birthday and I realize she will have to make a decision to fly the coop in 5 years and I want her to be prepared to do it financially. A few years ago I told my daughter that when she is 18 she had to go to college or move out. I can’t believe that was so memorable to this day she thinks that’s the way it is. Ha – be careful what you wish for, right – now I’ve got to come up with college tuition.


I could hope she goes easy on us and goes to a public school in our resident state CA where education is relatively cheaper than other places. But – hope is never a good investment plan, nor is it a college savings strategy either. Being that I’m a planner and need to understand how I will make a college education happen for my kids, I’m setting boundaries on their education. In other words, I’m budgeting for about $20,000 per year for my kids college education expenses for 4 years each. After 4 years they are on their own. That’s what I can afford with the existing savings I have for them and any additional money I can contribute from my income. I’m planning on telling them that in high school so they have an idea of what to expect for college. If they want to go to a more expensive school, the rest is on them. This is the number I’ve come up with, what’s yours? If you’re a parent and have a college bound child – come up with the number that doesn’t touch your retirement accounts quickly and plan to make it happen.


Knowing my daughter, she has expensive taste. She’s probably going to want to go to a private university that won’t be covered by my budget, then what? I will support her 100%. By support I mean helping her find the additional resources to make it there. What I don’t mean is spending more of my own money then what I’ve budgeted for her. I will also provide her with the financial education she needs to make sure that she values the additional cost coming from her own pocket enough to commit to it. What I worry about is will she understand what kind of job she will need to get after college in order to pay off the loans and support herself in the career of her choice when she graduates. This brings up the question for my title. Wow. Why is it that our government is the largest lender for college loans and the largest provider of primary education and still hasn’t mandated a course in high school that discusses real world finances? What a disconnect? No wonder the government gets stiffed and has to forgive so many student loans. We teach them to borrow money when they aren’t even adults. Then we teach them how to get their loans forgiven after college*. This is poor advice. Why is society telling our kids to sign on the dotted line for a college education that could make them indebted to our government without giving them the resources to understand what they are signing away. Do you wonder why the governments’ finances are not so good? Why are we forgiving so many student loans and still not creating an education system to teach them about real world money issues?
Think about it. If you want a reverse mortgage, the government says you have to be counseled before you can get one. Before you get your drivers license when you are 16, you have to take a class on Basic State Requirements before you can get your drivers permit or license. Shouldn’t we include in high school the same resources to teach our kids about how to read a paycheck, a loan note, a household budget, and what real world salaries look like before we ask them to make a commitment to go to a university that could make them in debt for the majority of their lives? What do you think?


*https://studentaid.ed.gov/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation – This is part of a federal government site where they give information on federal student loan forgiveness.

The information being provided is strictly as a courtesy. When you access one of these websites, you are leaving our website and assume total responsibility and risk for your use of the websites you are linking to. We make no representation as to the completeness or accuracy of information provided at these websites. Nor is the company liable for any direct or indirect technical or system issues or any consequences arising out of your access to or your use of third-party technologies, websites, information and programs made available through this website

Getting a Jump on Tax Season

What should you bring to your preparer?

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

You can file your federal tax return starting January 20.

IRS filing season will start right on time in 2015, and there is wisdom in filing your 1040 well before April 15. You can get it out of the way earlier, and if you e-file, you can put yourself in position for an earlier refund.1

What should you gather up for your tax professional?

If you want to save time and possibly money along with it, come to your preparer’s office ready with the appropriate paperwork. If you own a business, that list includes all W-2s and 1099-MISC forms you get from clients, any 1099-INT and K-1 forms displaying interest income, your Schedule C and P&L reports, and any and all paperwork you can round up detailing your expenses – your personal expenses too, not only business costs but also any tuition, medical and miscellaneous ones. If you have made charitable contributions worth itemizing, that paperwork needs to reach your preparer. The same goes for documents detailing mortgage interest, other forms of interest paid, and any tax already paid.2

If you have receipt management software, your preparer will love you for using it (beats getting a manila envelope, file folder or shoebox full of receipts to sort through). If a calamity or an accident destroyed a bunch of your business records, remember that the IRS may give you a break – but your preparer needs solid proof of the misfortune to try and make a case to the IRS and get you some leniency.

What are some things people too often forget to bring? Social Security numbers for new babies (and taxpayer-ID numbers and contact information for the nannies of those babies). Logs of unreimbursed mileage. Real estate stuff, too: closing letters related to a refi, receipts for real estate taxes (assuming they haven’t been paid through escrow).3

 

If you received any health insurance subsidies, you may want to wait until February.

Did you pay for your own health insurance in 2014? Do you remember how you had to estimate your 2014 income when you applied for coverage? If you got a subsidy, it was based on that estimate, and an estimate is by definition inexact. Some taxpayers ended up earning more than the incomes they estimated to the exchanges, some less. That could mean one of two things: a big 2014 tax refund, or owing thousands more in taxes.4

If you pay for your own health coverage, the exchange at which you bought it should send you Form 1095-A by January 31. Form 1095-A will list how your household self-insures: who pays premiums, and the amount of any monthly subsidies. Your preparer can plug these details into Form 8962, which explains the breakdown on insurance, subsidies and income for your household to the IRS. If you were only self-insured for part of 2014, your preparer must note any subsidy payments by the month.4

 

Should you jump to a new tax professional?

If he or she is aloof, sloppy, or seems more like a file clerk than someone interested in minimizing your tax burden, maybe you should switch. There are some tax preparers who outsource their work to people overseas, and you probably don’t want that to happen to your return. We are early in 2015, and if you really have the itch to switch, consider taking your 2013 return to 2-3 candidates – not only to get a tax prep quote, but to see if they have insight on your situation that your current preparer lacks.5

In getting a jump on tax season, you can get that bothersome item off your to-do list sooner and focus on the more exciting parts of your career, business or life.

Disclosures:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Kim Gaxiola, CFP® Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.

TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suite 300| San Jose, CA 95113 P:800.584.3652

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
1 – forbes.com/sites/robertwood/2014/12/29/irs-announces-2014-tax-return-filing-opens-starting-january-20-2015/ [12/29/14]
2 – outright.com/blog/what-do-you-need-to-bring-to-your-accountant-at-tax-time/ [3/18/14]
3 – foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/2014/03/18/what-documents-should-take-to-tax-preparer/ [3/18/14]
4 – money.cnn.com/2015/01/02/pf/taxes/obamacare-income-tax-subsidies/ [1/2/15]
5 – dailyfinance.com/2014/12/25/hire-cpa-prepare-taxes/ [12/25/14]

Yes, Young Growing Families Can Save & Invest

Yes, Young Growing Families Can Save & Invest

It may seem like a tall order, but it can be accomplished.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Plan to put yourself steps ahead of your peers.

If you have a young, growing family, no doubt your to-do list is pretty long on any given day. Beyond today, you are probably working on another kind of to-do list for the long term. Where does “saving and investing” rank on that list?

For some families, it never quite ranks high enough – and it never becomes the priority it should become. Assorted financial pressures, sudden shifts in household needs, bad luck – they can all move “saving and investing” down the list. Even so, young families have planned to build wealth in the face of such stresses. You can follow their example. It is less an option than a necessity.

 

 

First step: put it into numbers.

Most people have invested a little by the time they reach 30 or 35, and some have invested avidly. A plan is not always in place, however. The mission is simply to “make money” or “build wealth” for “the future.”

This is good, but also vague. How much money will you need to save by 65 to promote enough retirement income and to live comfortably? Are you on pace to build a retirement nest egg that large? How much risk do you feel comfortable tolerating as you invest? What kind of impact are investment fees and taxes having on your efforts?

A financial professional can help you arrive at answers to these questions, and others. He or she can help you define long-range retirement savings goals and project the amount of savings and income you may need to sustain your lifestyle as retirees. At that point, “the future” will seem more tangible and your wealth-building effort even more purposeful.

 

 

 

 

Second step: start today & never stop.

If you have already started, congratulations! In getting an early start, you have taken advantage of a young investor’s greatest financial asset: time.

If you haven’t started saving and investing, you can do so now. It doesn’t take a huge lump sum to begin. Even if you defer $100 worth of salary into a retirement plan a month, you are putting a foot forward. See if you can allocate much more.

If you begin when you are young and keep at it, you will witness the awesome power of compounding as you build your retirement savings and net worth through the years.

Just how awesome is it? An example: let’s say you save $100 per month in an investment account for 20 years and the account returns a (hypothetical) 5% for you over those two decades. In 20 years under such conditions, your $100-a-month nest egg will not amount to $24,000 – it will work out to $41,011, which is 71% more! If you put in $200 a month, you wind up with a projected $82,022 off of the $24,000 in contributions! We aren’t factoring in account fees or market fluctuations, of course – but you get the picture. Stretched out to 30 years, a consistent $100-per-month contribution and a consistent 5% return project to $82,302; raise the monthly contribution to $200 and you get $164,604. These numbers factor in annual compounding; use daily compounding as the variable, and they grow a bit larger. So even if you set aside and invest a few twenties each month, you may still end up with appreciable retirement savings – and these are numbers for one retirement saver, there are two of you.1

What’s that? You say you can’t retire on $164,000 or less? You’re absolutely right. You have to devote more than that to your effort. You may need a million or two – and if you plan ahead, you may very well generate it. Ownership of equity investments, real property, business or professional success – this can all help to position you and your family for a comfortable future, provided you keep good financial habits along the way and pay attention to taxes.

 

 

How do you find the balance?

This is worth addressing – how do you balance saving and investing with attending to your family’s immediate financial needs?

Bottom line, you have to find money to save and invest for your family’s near-term and long-term goals. If it isn’t on hand, you may find it by reducing certain household costs. Are you spending a lot of money on goods and services you want rather than need? Cut back on that kind of spending. Is credit card debt siphoning away dollars you should assign to saving and investing? Fix that financial leak and avoid paying with plastic whenever you can. Other young families are doing it, and yours can as well.

Vow to keep “paying yourself first” – maintain the consistency of your saving and investing effort. What is more important, saving for your child’s college education or buying those season tickets? Who comes first in your life, your family or your gardener? You know the answer.

 

It has been done; it should be done.

Stories abound of families that have built wealth out of comparative poverty. There are people who came to this country with little more than the clothes on their backs who have found prosperity; there are families (including single-parent households) who have been dealt a bad hand yet overcame long financial odds to gain affluence.

It all starts with belief – the belief that you can do it. Complement that belief with a plan and regular saving and investing, and you may find yourself much better off much sooner than you think.

Disclosures:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Kim Gaxiola, CFP® Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.

TechGirl Financial by Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suite 300| San Jose, CA 95113

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– bankrate.com/calculators/savings/compound-savings-calculator-tool.aspx [12/26/14]

Holiday Blog

Holiday Blog

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

 Merry Christmas and Happy Hanukkah!

This is such a wonderful time to spend with family and friends. I hope you enjoy the season. I love to bring out my holiday TechGirl Financial logo at this time of year to create a sense of joy for the season. I’m aware however it can be stressful to some because of a limited budget. Here are some of the things I do to make sure I’m on top of my spending:

Check my credit card and bank app almost daily to see how much I’ve spent during the billing cycle.
Before I start shopping I set an amount of money I want to spend in total. Then divide it up between the recipients. On my list I add a line item for charity and myself! Stick as close to the budget as possible.
Online shopping can help a lot in sticking to a budget if you do searches within price ranges you want to spend.
Charity giving – if you intend on giving a substantial amount – consider giving appreciated stock. As an individual taxpayer, – you pay taxes on capital gains. However 501c3 non-profits do not pay taxes and can sell the stock without the tax hit. This will make your money stretch a little bit farther.
There are holiday shopping apps – take a look at them – they can also be helpful in keeping you to a budget.

Fall Financial Reminders

The year is coming to a close. Have you thought about these financial ideas yet?

As every calendar year ends, the window slowly closes on a set of financial opportunities. Here are several you might want to explore before 2015 arrives.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

Don’t forget that IRA RMD

If you own one or more traditional IRAs, you have to take your annual required minimum distribution (RMD) from one or more of those IRAs by December 31. If you are being asked to take your very first RMD, you actually have until April 15, 2015 to take it – but your 2015 income taxes may be substantially greater as a result. (Note: original owners of Roth IRAs never have to take RMDs from those accounts.)1

 

 

Did you recently inherit an IRA?

If you have and you weren’t married to the person who started that IRA, you must take the first RMD from that IRA by December 31 of the year after the death of that original IRA owner. You have to do it whether the account is a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA.1

Here’s another thing you might want to do with that newly inherited IRA before New Year’s Eve, though: you might want to divide it into multiple inherited IRAs, thereby promoting a lengthier payout schedule for younger inheritors of those assets. Otherwise, any co-beneficiaries receive distributions per the life expectancy of the oldest beneficiary. If you want to make this move, it must be done by the end of the year that follows the year in which the original IRA owner died.1

 

 

Can you max out your contribution to your workplace retirement plan?

Your employer likely sponsors a 401(k) or 403(b) plan, and you have until December 31 to boost your 2014 contribution. This year, the contribution limit on both plans is $17,500 for those under 50, $23,000 for those 50 and older.2,3

 

 

Can you do the same with your IRA?

Again, December 31 is your deadline for tax year 2014. This year, the traditional and Roth IRA contribution limit is $5,500 for those under 50, $6,500 for those 50 and older. High earners may face a lower Roth IRA contribution ceiling per their adjusted gross income level – above $129,000 AGI, an individual filing as single or head of household can’t make a Roth contribution for 2014, and neither can joint filers with AGI exceeding $191,000.3

 

 

Ever looked into a Solo(k) or a SEP plan?

If you have income from self-employment, you can save for the future using a self-directed retirement plan, such as a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan or a one-person 401(k), the so-called Solo(k). You don’t have to be exclusively self-employed to set one of these up – you can work full-time for someone else and contribute to one of these while also deferring some of your salary into the retirement plan sponsored by your employer.2

Contributions to SEPs and Solo(k)s are tax-deductible. December 31 is the deadline to set one up for 2014, and if you meet that deadline, you can make your contributions for 2014 as late as April 15, 2015 (or October 15, 2015 with a federal extension). You can contribute up to $52,000 to SEP for 2014, $57,500 if you are 50 or older. For a Solo(k), the same limits apply but they break down to $17,500 + up to 20% of your net self-employment income and $23,000 + 20% net self-employment income if you are 50 or older. If you contribute to a 401(k) at work, the sum of your employee salary deferrals plus your Solo(k) contributions can’t be greater than the aforementioned $17,500/$23,000 limits – but even so, you can still pour up to 20% of your net self-employment income into a Solo(k).1,2

 

 

Do you need to file IRS Form 706?

A sad occasion leads to this – the death of a spouse. Form 706, which should be filed no later than nine months after his or her passing, notifies the IRS that some or all of a decedent’s estate tax exemption is being carried over to the surviving spouse per the portability allowance. If your spouse passed in 2011, 2012, or 2013, the IRS is allowing you until December 31, 2014 to file the pertinent Form 706, which will transfer that estate planning portability to your estate if your spouse was a U.S. citizen or resident.1

 

 

Are you feeling generous?

You may want to donate appreciated securities to charity before the year ends (you may take a deduction amounting to their current market value at the time of the donation, and you can use it to counterbalance up to 30% of your AGI). Or, you may want to gift a child, relative or friend and take advantage of the annual gift tax exclusion. An individual can gift up to $14,000 this year to as many other individuals as he or she desires; a couple may jointly gift up to $28,000 to as many individuals as you wish. Whether you choose to gift singly or jointly, you’ve probably got a long way to go before using up the current $5.34 million/$10.68 million lifetime exemption. Wealthy grandparents often fund 529 plans this way, so it is worth noting that December 31 is the 529 funding deadline for the 2014 tax year.1

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– csmonitor.com/Business/new-economy/2014/1024/New-home-sales-inch-up-to-a-six-year-high-in-September [10/24/14]
2 – 247wallst.com/economy/2014/10/22/september-cpi-avoids-deflation-fears/ [10/22/14]
3 – conference-board.org/data/bcicountry.cfm?cid=1 [10/23/14]
4 – markets.on.nytimes.com/research/markets/usmarkets/usmarkets.asp [10/24/14]
5 – markets.wsj.com/us [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F24%2F13&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F23%2F09&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=DJIA&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=COMP&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
6 – bigcharts.marketwatch.com/historical/default.asp?symb=SPX&closeDate=10%2F25%2F04&x=0&y=0 [10/24/14]
7 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyield [10/24/14]
8 – treasury.gov/resource-center/data-chart-center/interest-rates/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=realyieldAll [10/24/14]

Should You Buy the Dips?

Should You Buy the Dips?

Market retreats & corrections may herald opportunities.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

When stocks retreat, should you pick up some shares?

If you like to buy and hold, it may turn out to be a great move.

Buying during a downturn or a correction may seem foolish to many, but if major indexes sink and investors lose their appetite for risk, you may find excellent opportunities to purchase shares of quality firms.

Remember what Warren Buffett said back in 2008: “A simple rule dictates my buying: Be fearful when others are greedy, and be greedy when others are fearful.” Even in that terrible bear market, savvy investors like Buffett sensed an eventual upside.1

 

 

Great stocks could go on sale.

Corrections and downturns are part of the natural cycle of the equities markets. Wall Street has seen 20 corrections (10% or greater declines in the S&P 500) in the last 70 years, and stocks have weathered all of them.2

A comeback can occur not long after a correction: as S&P Capital IQ chief stock strategist Sam Stovall reminded Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, it usually takes about four months for the market to get back to where it was.2

After a market descent, there is ultimately a point of capitulation – a turning point when investors start buying again. Prior to that moment, you may find some good deals. Why not make a list of stocks you would buy at the right price, and perhaps define that price?

 

 

 

Some downturns & corrections go under the radar.

Particular sectors of the market may dip 5%, 10% or more without much fanfare, because the focus is constantly on the movement of the big benchmarks. You might want to keep an eye on a particular slice of the market that has turned sour – it could turn sweet again, and sooner than bears think.

 

 

Don’t let the gloom dissuade you.

Remember 2008? Stocks were supposedly down for the count. You had people who believed the Dow would fall below 5,000 and stay there. They were wrong. Seasoned investors like Buffett knew that measures would be taken to repair the economy, restore confidence and right the markets.

As he noted in an October 2008 New York Times op-ed piece, “To be sure, investors are right to be wary of highly leveraged entities or businesses in weak competitive positions. But fears regarding the long-term prosperity of the nation’s many sound companies make no sense. These businesses will indeed suffer earnings hiccups, as they always have. But most major companies will be setting new profit records 5, 10 and 20 years from now.”1

Since the end of World War II, Wall Street has experienced 13 bear markets and 20 corrections. Even so, large-company stocks have returned an average of 11.1% per year since 1945.2

 

 

Decline thresholds may be useful.

If you practice dollar-cost averaging (i.e., you invest a set amount of money each month in your retirement account), you know that your money will end up buying more shares when prices are lower and fewer when they are higher. You can lift this strategy and apply it in a market dip or downturn. Instead of investing a set amount of funds per time period, you invest a set amount of funds at a decline threshold. So if the balance of your retirement account falls 5%, you put a set amount of funds in. If shares of a particular company fall 5%, you use a set amount of funds to acquire more of them.

Some people don’t like the buy-and-hold approach and would contend that tactical asset allocation has the potential to work just as well or better in a downturn. Whether you like to buy and hold or not, the chance to buy low is not easily dismissed. No one is guaranteeing you will sell high, of course – but you might find bargains amid all the bears.

 

 

Think about taking the opportunity to add to your portfolio if the market pulls back.

A market drop may be your cue to buy shares of quality companies at a cheaper price.

Disclosure:

TechGirl Financial is a part of Gaxiola Financial Group. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Gaxiola Financial Group are not affiliated.

Gaxiola Financial Group | San Jose address 111 N. Market St. Suite 300 San Jose, CA 95113.

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2014/02/04/where-to-get-greedy-now-that-others-are-fearful/ [2/4/14]

2 – kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C008-S002-how-to-survive-a-stock-market-correction.html [8/14]

Financial Considerations for 2015

Financial Considerations for 2015

Is it time to make a few alterations for the near future?

2015 is less than three months away. Fall is the time when investors look for ways to lower their taxes and make some financial. This is an ideal time to schedule a meeting with a financial, tax or estate planning professional.

Provided by Kim Gaxiola

How do economists see next year unfolding?

Morningstar sees 2.0-2.5% GDP for the U.S. for 2015, with housing, export growth, wage growth, very low interest rates and continuing vitality of energy-dependent industries as key support factors. It sees the jobless rate in a 5.4-5.7% range and annualized inflation running between 1.8-2.0%. Fitch is far more optimistic, envisioning U.S. GDP at 3.1% for 2015 compared to 1.3% for the eurozone and Japan. (Fitch projects China’s economy slowing to 6.8% growth next year as India’s GDP improves dramatically to 6.5%.)1,2

The Wall Street Journal’s Economic Forecasting Survey projects America’s GDP at 2.8% for both 2015 and 2016 and sees slightly higher inflation for 2015 than Morningstar (with the CPI rising at an annualized 2.0-2.2%). The Journal has the jobless rate at 5.9% by the end of this year and at 5.5% by December 2015.3

The WSJ numbers roughly correspond to the Federal Reserve’s outlook: the Fed sees 2.6-3.0% growth and 5.4-5.6% unemployment next year. A National Association for Business Economics (NABE) poll projects 2015 GDP of 2.9% with the jobless rate at 5.6% by next December.4

 

 

 

What might happen with interest rates?

In the Journal’s consensus forecast, the federal funds rate will hit 0.47% by June 2015 and 1.17% by December 2015. NABE’s forecast merely projects it at 0.845% as next year concludes. That contrasts with Fed officials, who see it in the range of 1.25-1.50% at the end of 2015.3,4

Speaking of interest rates, here is the WSJ consensus projection for the 10-year Treasury yield: 3.24% by next June, then 3.58% by the end of 2015. The latest WSJ survey also sees U.S. home prices rising 3.3% for 2015 and NYMEX crude at $93.67 a barrel by the end of next year.3

 

 

 

Can you put a little more into your IRA or workplace retirement plan?

You may put up to $5,500 into a traditional or Roth IRA for 2014 and up to $6,500 if you are 50 or older this year, assuming your income levels allow you to do so. (Or you can spread that maximum contribution across more than one IRA.) Traditional IRA contributions are tax-deductible to varying degree. The contribution limit for participants in 401(k), 403(b) and most 457 plans is $17,500 for 2014, with a $5,500 catch-up contribution allowed for those 50 and older. (The IRS usually sets next year’s contribution levels for these plans in late October.)5

 

 

Should you go Roth in 2015?

If you have a long time horizon to let your IRA grow, have the funds to pay the tax on the conversion, and want your heirs to inherit tax-free distributions from your IRA, it may be worth it.

 

 

 

Are you thinking about an IRA rollover?

You should know about IRS Notice 2014-54, which lets taxpayers make “split” IRA rollovers of employer-sponsored retirement plan assets under more favorable tax conditions. If you have a workplace retirement account with a mix of pre-tax and after-tax dollars in it, you can now roll the pre-tax funds into a traditional IRA and the after-tax funds into a Roth IRA and have it all count as one distribution rather than two. Also, the IRS is dropping the pro rata tax treatment of such rollover amounts. (Under the old rules, if you were in a qualified retirement plan and rolled $80,000 in pre-tax dollars into a traditional IRA and $20,000 in after-tax dollars into a Roth IRA, 80% of the dollars going into the Roth would be taxed under the pro-rated formula.) The tax liability that previously went with such “split” distributions has been eliminated. The new rules on this take effect January 1, but IRS guidance indicates that taxpayers may apply the rules to rollovers made as early as September 18, 2014.6

 

 

Can you harvest portfolio losses before 2015?

Through tax loss harvesting – dumping the losers in your portfolio – you can claim losses equaling any capital gains recognized in a tax year, and you can claim up to $3,000 in additional losses beyond that, which can offset dividend, interest and wage income. If your losses exceed that limit, they can be carried over into future years. It is a good idea to do this before December, as that will give you the necessary 30 days to repurchase any shares should you wish.7

 

 

Should you wait on a major financial move until 2015?

Is there a chance that your 2014 taxable income could jump as a consequence of exercising a stock option, receiving a bonus at work, or accepting a lump sum payout? Are you thinking about buying new trucks or cars for your company, or a buying a building? The same caution applies to capital investments.

 

 

Look at tax efficiency in your portfolio.

You may want to put income-producing investments inside an IRA, for example, and direct investments with lesser tax implications into brokerage accounts.

 

 

Finally, do you need to change your withholding status?

If major change has come to your personal or financial life, it might be time. If you have married or divorced, if a family member has passed away, if you are self-employed now or have landed a much higher-salaried job, or if you either pay a lot of tax or get unusually large IRS or state refunds, review your current withholding with your tax preparer.

 

 

 

Tech Girl Financial is a part of Discover Financial Happiness. Registered representative, securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., Broker-dealer, member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisor representative, Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a registered investment advisor. Cambridge and Discover Financial Happiness are not affiliated.
Discover Financial Happiness | 111 North Market Street suit 300| San Jose, CA 95113
This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively traded blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weighted index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc. (NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or ArcaEx®, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world’s largest physical commodity futures exchange and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading conducted through two divisions – the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum, and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade. Additional risks are associated with international investing, such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in accounting standards. This material represents an assessment of the market environment at a specific point in time and is not intended to be a forecast of future events, or a guarantee of future results. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Investments will fluctuate and when redeemed may be worth more or less than when originally invested. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional.

Citations.
– forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2014/02/04/where-to-get-greedy-now-that-others-are-fearful/ [2/4/14]

2 – kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C008-S002-how-to-survive-a-stock-market-correction.html [8/14]

Lean In To Retirement

Check out TechGirl Financial's Article Series on how to "Lean In To Retirement".

About the Founder

Kim will put you at ease with your financial planning and help you to create a clear picture of your financial future!

Check the background of this investment professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck

Contact Us

Northern California
111 N. Market Street, Suite 300
San Jose, CA 95113
Toll-Free:  800-584-3652
Contact Us

Stay Informed

Get the latest financial news & more!

Disclosure

Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisors Services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, a Registered Investment Advisor.

Tech Girl Financial is not affiliated with Cambridge. Check the background of this investment professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AZ, CA, CO, FL, ID, IL, IN, KY, MI, MT, NC, NH, NJ, NV, OR, SC, SD, VA, WI. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside the specific states referenced.

© 2018 Tech Girl Financial, All Rights Reserved

Close

Sign Up for Free Updates!

Receive free updates directly to your inbox.