fbpx

What will you do when your money works for you? | Call 1-800-584-3652 | Account

restricted stock units

The Taxation of Restricted Stock Units (RSUs)

What Employees Need to Know

Provided by TechGirl Financial

Is your employer giving you restricted stock units (RSUs)? Here are some details about RSUs, which differ from stock options in both their nature and taxation. 

Remember that this article is for illustrative purposes only and not a replacement for real-life advice. Please contact a tax, legal, or accounting professional before implementing a strategy or modifying an existing strategy involving restricted stock units.

RSUs are not yet shares of stock. They are a perk for your loyalty or job performance, and basically, a promise from your employer. The promise is this: at some point in the future, the company will deliver one share of stock to you for every RSU in your name. The delivery of RSUs usually happens in phases, across a few years.1

With RSUs, you don’t have to buy any shares, but you also don’t possess any shares until the company delivers them to you. In contrast, stock options are opportunities: essentially, they are contracts that let employees buy company shares at a set price, within a set timeframe.1,2

As you might assume, this fundamental difference leads to stock options and RSUs being treated differently under tax laws.

Taxes are usually withheld on income from RSUs. Since RSUs amount to a form of compensation, they become part of your taxable income, and because RSU income is considered supplemental income, the withholding rate can vary from 22% to 37%. If you don’t want any withholding, your employer may be able to liquidate a percentage of the shares to effectively help you meet a withholding requirement (in essence, you pay the withheld tax by having the company take it out of the shares). Without any withholding, you may end up paying quarterly income taxes, which could be a new experience for you.1,3

If you live in a high-tax state, your RSU income might be taxed as much as 50%. In addition to federal income tax, RSU income may also be subject to state and local income taxes.1 

You may have a capital gain on your RSU. Say you sell the shares for more than their fair market value (that is, the amount they are worth on the open market). If the transaction producing that gain comes within a year of the vesting date of the RSU shares, then the gain is defined as short-term by the Internal Revenue Service. Short-term capital gains are taxed at regular income tax rates. If the transaction occurs more than a year after the vesting date, then long-term capital gains taxes apply (they currently top out at 30%).1,3

Generally, the value of your RSU shares reflects the market value of your employer’s stock. This is an important consideration for your financial future, and also, why you want to talk with a financial professional (and maybe a tax professional) after your company grants you restricted stock units.

Kim Gaxiola, CFP® may be reached at 800.584.3652  or at kim@techgirlfinancial.com


This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.
Registered Representative of and securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advisory services offered through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. TechGirl Financial™ and Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., are not affiliated companies.
Citations.
1. MYRAWealth, July 30, 2020
2. TheStreet, February 13, 2020 3. TurboTax, July 30, 2020

Restricted Stock Units, RSUs, Tax Planning, Taxes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Lean In To Retirement

Check out TechGirl Financial's Article Series on how to "Lean In To Retirement".

About the Founder

Kim will put you at ease with your financial planning and help you to create a clear picture of your financial future!

Check the background of this investment professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck

Contact Us

Northern California
111 N. Market Street, Suite 300
San Jose, CA 95113
Toll-Free:  800-584-3652
Contact Us

Stay Informed

Get the latest financial news & more!

Disclosure

Securities offered through Registered Representatives of Cambridge Investment Research, Inc., a Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC. Advisors Services through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, a Registered Investment Advisor.

Tech Girl Financial is not affiliated with Cambridge. Check the background of this investment professional on FINRA's BrokerCheck.
This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of AZ, CA, CO, FL, ID, IL, IN, KY, MI, MT, NC, NH, NJ, NV, OR, SC, SD, VA, WI. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside the specific states referenced.

© 2020 Tech Girl Financial, All Rights Reserved

Close

Sign Up for Free Updates!

Receive free updates directly to your inbox.

%d bloggers like this: